Session Schedule

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Wednesday, May 4, 2016

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09:00 - 10:00 Extreme Mapping (Ballroom A) In an ideal world, if we want to explore a region we can easily get precursor data and information. Nothing obstructs flyover data gathering; we have open access to the areas we want to explore. It is easy to travel there, use instruments and take samples. This is true for many regions on Earth. Scientists want to go into the field themselves, so they can personally observe the context and surrounding environment. They make inferences about the surrounding area by direct observation of the geology, biology and physical world that they observe and measure. Scientists do... Extreme Mapping (Ballroom A)
10:00 - 10:30Break
10:30 - 11:05 TileReduce: Distributed Spatial Data Processing in JavaScript TileReduce is an open source JavaScript library for writing highly scalable data analysis scripts using Mapbox Vector Tile data. Using parallel computing across tiles, TileReduce allows for extremely high performance geospatial processing with minimal complexity. We will go over how TileReduce works under the hood, and discuss how we use TileReduce at Mapbox to crunch massive datasets to improve OpenStreetMap. TileReduce: Distributed Spatial Data Processing in JavaScript Portable OSM - OSM in the Disconnected Wilds OpenStreetMap is amazing. Many of the offline tools are amazing. However, for intensive mapping by small teams, the existing tools fall short and make editing and contributing to OSM difficult. This is especially true in remote communities and parts of the developing world that lack reliable internet connectivity. Because the Red Cross’ mapping locations are so remote, we needed a better way to interact and edit OSM in a disconnected way for days and potentially weeks at a time. Portable OSM (POSM) combines an offline OSM API, Field Papers, OpenMapKit, a captive portal, and many new... Portable OSM - OSM in the Disconnected Wilds The Space Between: web mapping with municipal curblines data On maps, streets are usually represented by street centerlines. At lower (farther) zoom levels these lines are useful and provide an overview of the connectivity and hierarchy of a network. These lines are also an appropriate syntax for optimizing the transportation of people and objects across physical space using the fewest number of the highest-bandwidth vertices available, but become visually awkward at higher (closer) zoom levels, especially in urban settings where understanding the volume of the space between buildings and the objects within it (like trees and benches) is better suited... The Space Between: web mapping with municipal curblines data A Platform for Data Interoperability: Koop There is no shortage of geographic data available on the web with more source coming online all the time. The downside of this explosion is that new sources often have their own API and proprietary formats that are not compatible with each other. A single data source on it's own is never as useful as when it is viewed in context. What is needed is a platform for interoperability. Koop steps into this challenge by treating GeoJSON as a kind of compile target. As long as data can be fetched and translated, any dataset from any source can be viewed alongside any other. The ArcGIS Open Data... A Platform for Data Interoperability: Koop
11:15 - 11:50 GeoWave: How Space Filling Curves accelerate ingest and query of Geospatial data GeoWave is an open source project that bridges the gap between geospatial software and distributed compute systems. This presentation will primarily focus on the theory that enables the core functionality of GeoWave. GeoWave was developed at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) in collaboration with Booz Allen Hamilton and RadiantBlue Technologies. GeoWave leverages a distributed key-value store to manage terabytes of raster and vector data, serving as an enterprise level geospatial data store. To efficiently index geospatial data and answer queries with geospatial... GeoWave: How Space Filling Curves accelerate ingest and query of Geospatial data New features in WhirlyGlobe-Maply Version 2.4 and Beyond WhirlyGlobe-Maply is an open source geospatial display toolkit for mobile devices. It's just celebrating its 5th birthday and passed 100k lines of code last year. Millions of people use it in apps like Dark Sky and National Geographic World Atlas every day. We'll discuss some of the new features in 2.4 and 2.4.1 like particle systems, point clouds, vector tiles and custom map projections. The SDK's main platform is iOS, but we'll cover the status of the Android port too. It's useful to know who drives an open source project, so we'll talk briefly about the people behind it. We're up... New features in WhirlyGlobe-Maply Version 2.4 and Beyond Cartography with Inkscape Sometimes your map needs a little extra polish. In this talk, I will outline my workflow for bringing maps from QGIS into Inkscape and exporting to commonly used formats to produces a finished professional-quality map. It will include "do's" and "don'ts" to help you develop your own workflow and avoid common pitfalls, as well as some features unique to Inkscape such as filters. Cartography with Inkscape OpenAddresses: A collection of open address data In this talk, we'll give an overview of OpenAddresses, a constantly growing collection of address-level geographic data from around the world. We collect data from over 1,100 data sources, lightly modify it to pick out the fields we need, and create a CSV with over 215 million rows of data. The output of our community-built system is used by commercial and government entities to build geocoding tools. A community of 70+ people contribute to this dataset via GitHub, finding new data sources and submitting pull requests for data while a background processing system downloads and manipulates the... OpenAddresses: A collection of open address data
11:50 - 13:30Lunch (Ballroom B)
13:30 - 14:05 Empirical Mining of Large Data Sets Helps to Solve Practical Large-Scale Forest Management and Monitoring Problems We present a panoply of examples where empirical mining and statistical analysis of large data sets have already proven useful to help handle vexing problems within the realm of large-scale forest ecology. Some prejudices may exist against empirical approaches, in favor of more process-oriented analytical methods. Because a full understanding and appreciation of particular ecological phenomena are possible only after process-driven, hypothesis-directed research, some forest ecologists may feel that purely empirical data harvesting may represent a less-than-satisfactory approach.... Empirical Mining of Large Data Sets Helps to Solve Practical Large-Scale Forest Management and Monitoring Problems GeoSHAPE: FOSS GIS Collaboration Platform with Web & Mobile Clients Looking for an open source geospatial platform with versioned web editing capabilities built for your enterprise? Look no further than GeoSHAPE, a FOSS project empowers organizations to create, edit, share and visualize information through dynamic, collaborative web maps. GeoSHAPE has been built utilizing open source software and open standards to make it available for partners and to maximize interoperability. GeoSHAPE is the integration of geospatial portal (GeoNode), a web mapping client (MapLoom), and a mobile application (Arbiter), that leverages the infrastructure provided by a... GeoSHAPE: FOSS GIS Collaboration Platform with Web & Mobile Clients 3D Tiles: Beyond 2D Tiling This talk presents the next big initiative from the Cesium team: 3D Tiles. 3D Tiles are an open specification for streaming massive heterogeneous 3D geospatial datasets, including 3D buildings, trees, point clouds, vector data, and terrain. This talk covers: * Why traditional 2D tiling schemes don't generalize well to 3D. * How 3D Tiles provides flexibility and performance for diverse 3D use cases. * The relationship between 3D Tiles and glTF, the open-standard runtime 3D model format from Khronos. * The state of the 3D Tiles ecosystem, including the open-source Cesium... 3D Tiles: Beyond 2D Tiling Piazza: Enabling Government Teams to Share and Access Data in the Cloud in 2016 Groups within government enterprises face many obstacles in accessing and sharing data and services between teams and workgroups, including proprietary APIs, silo’d sources, lack of support for bringing external data stores in-house, cross-dataset search, and configurable alerting. Furthermore, in 2016, a solution to these problems should be deployable by engineers within the team (as opposed to requiring enterprise-level rollouts), available via a simple and direct API for developers on the team, and native to the cloud for scalable performance and size.... Piazza: Enabling Government Teams to Share and Access Data in the Cloud in 2016 Advancing Spatial History in the Classroom with MapStory.org MapStory.org is a free and open source "open educational resource" that empowers students of all ages to better understand how the world evolves over time and place. It has been built gradually over the past few years with help from many stakeholders in the Foss4g community and is now ready for use in classrooms across the country, and the world. Depending on their interests and abilities, MapStory.org users can upload openly licensed spatiotemporal data, version edit these data to make them more complete and accurate, and create geospatial narratives ('mapstories') that help explain data in... Advancing Spatial History in the Classroom with MapStory.org
14:15 - 14:50 Lessons learned deploying a big-data geospatial system on AWS During the past year we undertook an effort to transition a geospatial data processing system developed under a government research project from a small private cluster running Windows to an AWS-based environment running Linux. This talk will cover a variety of subjects including the steps taken to migrate the system, hurdles encountered with Linux and AWS (particularly differences in performance), and how we ended up working around those issues. The system in question leverages about 18 TB of satellite imagery, OSM, DEM and other sources and extracts information such as 2m landcover... Lessons learned deploying a big-data geospatial system on AWS OGC SensorThings API - Open IoT Made Easy This presentation will introduce and demonstrate the OGC SensorThings API. The OGC SensorThings API is a new Open Geospatial Consortium standard that provides an open and unified way to interconnect the Internet of Things (IoT) devices, data, and applications over the Web. Unlike the traditional OGC standards, SensorThings API is very simple and efficient. At the same time, it is also comprehensive and designed to handle complex use cases. It builds on a rich set of proven-working and widely-adopted open standards, such as the OGC Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) standards, including the ISO/OGC... OGC SensorThings API - Open IoT Made Easy Web-based management and visualization of massive 3D city models based on open standards and open source components The usage and importance of virtual 3D city models is steadily increasing in diverse application areas such as 3D cadastre, urban planning and simulation or disaster management. Cities and users therefore need an open, vendor-neutral and standards-based platform for the management and visualization of 3D city models as basis for the numerous applications and digital systems consuming the 3D city model data. The international OGC standard for the representation, storage and exchange of virtual 3D city models used by many cities worldwide is CityGML. It is a GML3 application schema to represent... Web-based management and visualization of massive 3D city models based on open standards and open source components Hootenanny: Creating an Open Source Conflation Engine As geographic vector datasets continue to become more commonplace and available to the public, GIS users find they routinely work with maps that can vary in format, coverage, attribute schema, completeness, and accuracy. Often times the solution is to work with parts of each dataset in order to produce a superior “best-of-breed” conflated map that leverages the best features and information from each of the individual sources. To this end, semi-automated conflation tools and services were developed in the Hootenanny project to provide an open source, standardized, way of conflating... Hootenanny: Creating an Open Source Conflation Engine TeachOSM: Putting Open Source Mapping in the Classroom TeachOSM is an emerging resource for educators and instructors to help them integrate OpenStreetMap in their classroom and lessons. This presentation will show how TeachOSM is helping teachers use OpenStreetMap to teach basic geographic concepts and in the process, train the next generation of mappers. The presentation will also highlight things such as TeachOSM programming initiatives and activities, Geobadges, new service-based learning opportunities for those who contribute to open mapping projects such as MapGive, MissingMaps, Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team. Lastly, the... TeachOSM: Putting Open Source Mapping in the Classroom
15:00 - 15:35 Consuming NEXRAD (Doppler Radar) using Containers on Amazon Elastic Beanstalk One of the growing number of public data sets available on Amazon Web Services is the Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD). This is data collected from a network of 160 high-resolution Doppler radar sites that detect precipitation and atmospheric movement at approximately 5 minute intervals from each radar site. NEXRAD enables severe storm prediction and is used by researchers and commercial enterprises to study and address the impact of weather across multiple sectors. The real-time feed and full historical archive of original resolution (Level II) NEXRAD data, from June 1991 to present,... Consuming NEXRAD (Doppler Radar) using Containers on Amazon Elastic Beanstalk OpenSensorHub for SensorWebs and IoT OpenSensorHub (http://www.opensensorhub.org) is an open source software community being built around the development and deployment of a new software stack supporting the full vision of the OGC® Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) suite of standards, as well as some IoT protocols (https://github.com/sensorhub). The goal is to allow easy deployment all types of sensors/actuators (in-situ and remote sensors, mobile or static, etc.) within a cross-community context and interconnect them through the web in a fully... OpenSensorHub for SensorWebs and IoT Migrating from Google Earth to Cesium - How to begin your closed-to-open source success story From 2008 until recently, the proprietary Google Earth ecosystem was the primary tool for 3D geospatial visualization on the web. However, Google announced that support for the Google Earth API and Google Earth plug-in will be discontinued early in 2016. As a result, many developers have looked to open source and open standards as a replacement solution in order to avoid the vendor lock-in they endured in the past. The clear front-runner for filling this role is Cesium, an open source WebGL based JavaScript library for 3D globes and 2D maps. This presentation gives an overview of... Migrating from Google Earth to Cesium - How to begin your closed-to-open source success story Microservices and You - the straight dope You have started to hear about microservices and you want to learn more about what happens when the rubber meets the road. In this talk I will cover the process I went through in constructing http://wwww.flatfluffy.com, a multi-device application for gamified recording of roadkill. While I will briefly cover how I went about the process, I will pay particular attention to how to get started, understanding what microservices ACTUALLY needs, and how you too can be a microservices practitioner. My talk style is informal and interactive so there will be a back and forth to discuss some of your... Microservices and You - the straight dope Opening Up the Classroom: Teaching GIS with Open Source Tools Open source mapping tools present an opportunity to engage GIS students in critical learning in ways that blackbox tools do not. In this presentation I will discuss the experience of converting a traditional, collegiate “Introduction to GIS” course to exclusively open source tools and data including QGIS and OpenStreetMap. I’ll highlight some of the obstacles to making this change that I encountered both at the institutional level and from the students themselves, as well as how delving into the world of open source helped students think more critically about their maps and the work that... Opening Up the Classroom: Teaching GIS with Open Source Tools
15:35 - 16:15Break
16:15 - 16:50 Geo(Mesa/Wave/Trellis/Jinni): Processing Geospatial Data at Scale @locationtech LocationTech is a working group inside of Eclipse Foundation that a set of 4 open source projects dealing with large geospatial datasets call home: GeoTrellis, GeoWave, GeoMesa, and GeoJinni (sense a pattern?). These projects were created to solve the type of problems that we are seeing more and more of: how do we ask very large geospatial data questions concerning location? In this talk, I will give an introduction to those four projects, and talk about how each project approaches processing geospatial data at scale. This talk covers the basics, such as: - what does "processing... Geo(Mesa/Wave/Trellis/Jinni): Processing Geospatial Data at Scale @locationtech GIS on virtual reality glasses with mobile map tools Recently, Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality have become fields of increasing popularity, thanks to projects as Oculus, Google Glass or Microsoft Hololens. During the last months our team has work to include Virtual Reality features into the Glob3 Mobile (G3m) project. These new functionalities allow to explore the virtual earth created by the render engine of G3m and explore it from a first person perspective. These features imply two major changes, adding head attitude tracking support, and enabling stereo rendering. The first task implies recognizing the orientation of the device that... GIS on virtual reality glasses with mobile map tools "Hiroshima Archive" and disaster digital archives series It has been 70 years since the atomic bombs fell upon Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Few survivors remain today and soon there will be none. Who then can speak from personal experiences of the effects of nuclear war upon humanity? Combining material from many sources, the "Hiroshima Archive" provides a comprehensive telling of the bombing of Hiroshima and the aftermath that followed. The goal of the "Hiroshima Archive... "Hiroshima Archive" and disaster digital archives series GeoGig: A Git-Like Approach To Geospatial In the talk Joe will:  Explain how to get up and running with GeoGig Work through how to manage changing datasets Demonstrate the QGIS GeoGig Plugin Run through using GeoGig to work with example open data Walk through a scenario with multiple distributed contributors Talk through the findings of TechLab's work with GeoGig so far GeoGig: A Git-Like Approach To Geospatial Geo4all - OSGeo education and research outreach: how it works and how to join Since its establishment in 2011 through MoU between OSGeo and the International Cartographic Association (ICA) the global network of academic Open Source Geospatial laboratories has reached over 100 members from all continents. ISPRS joined the initiative in 2014. This session describes the mission of the initiative, its current activities and infrastructure and explains the simple process of joining the network. Examples of lab collaborations and contributions to open source geospatial projects will provide inspiration for others to participate. Geo4all - OSGeo education and research outreach: how it works and how to join
17:00 - 17:15 GeoMesa, GeoBench, and SFCurve: Measuring and improving BigGeo performance GeoMesa is a LocationTech project which builds on open-source, distributed databases like Accumulo, HBase, and Cassandra to scale up indexing, querying, and analyzing billions of spatio-temporal data. This presentation will discuss the state of the GeoMesa project with a focus on two other LocationTech efforts: SFCurve and GeoBench. Distributed geo-databases built on key-value stores leverage space-filling curves for indexing, and SFCurve is a library aimed at providing implementations of the basic curves and a playground for further research. GeoBench is a project designed to benchmark... GeoMesa, GeoBench, and SFCurve: Measuring and improving BigGeo performance Zoning Out: Collecting and Mapping Data from 100+ Local Planning Departments PolicyMap is an online GIS for government, commercial, non-profit and academic users to access data about communities. We're currently creating a dataset of nationwide municipal zoning; city by city, zone by zone, and parcel by parcel. Why? Understanding zoning is a key tool urban planning nerds use to understand local real estate development and the built environment. Zoning is one of many administrative data sources that is managed at a municipal level, where local laws govern the definitions of zoning codes. Additionally, this data is challenging to work with because it changes often,... Zoning Out: Collecting and Mapping Data from 100+ Local Planning Departments Looking Beyond the Local Neighbourhood: Developing Topographic Indices with a Dynamic Kernel Why: Spatial and topographic position indicators (and related terrain indicators) enables Tesera to provide enhanced Forest Inventory services and Risk Assessment services for our clients. These indicators are leveraged in Machine Learning processes to help understand which geographic factors explain events, sampled parameters, or outcomes. What: Physical terrain characteristics have been derived and used in GIS spatial data analysis and visualization for decades. Some of the most common local neighbourhood characteristics being: 1) elevation statistics such as mean, max, min, and... Looking Beyond the Local Neighbourhood: Developing Topographic Indices with a Dynamic Kernel Bringing OpenStreetMap to the third dimension with 3D Tiles and Cesium OpenStreetMap and 3D visualization have been a goal of many for the past few years and there are numerous projects related to achieving this goal, each with various levels of success. With the advent of WebGL and Cesium as well as several new open formats, such as 3D Tiles; world scale, interactive, 3D visualization of OpenStreetMap on the web is finally within grasp. Even though the Cesium team has been working with heterogeneous geospatial data for years, we are relatively newcomers to the world of OSM. This not only gives us a fresh perspective, but provides us an opportunity to tell... Bringing OpenStreetMap to the third dimension with 3D Tiles and Cesium Have Your Cake and Eat it Too: Considerations for Storing Layers Regardless of whether you’re building a web map, RESTful service, desktop GUI, or ETL tool, your GIS application will most likely be storing and retrieving data from GIS layers. These layers will come in two flavors: layers you curated and created, and layers you didn’t create (possibly uploaded by your users). After presenting an introductory demo on GDAL and PostGIS at the December 2015 GeoDevKC Meetup, a good deal of the discussion afterward centered around best-practices and considerations on how to store and retrieve your GIS data within your application. What if multiple... Have Your Cake and Eat it Too: Considerations for Storing Layers
17:20 - 17:35 Fully Automated DEM Generation using Satellite Imagery High resolution and accurate Digital Elevation Model (DEM) generation from satellite imagery is a challenging problem. In this work, a multiview stereo reconstruction framework is proposed that is applicable to non-stereoscopic satellite images which may have been captured by different satellites. Given a cross-platform satellite image archive, the images are first geolocation corrected with respect to each other using a fully-automated processing pipeline that applies sparse feature matching and bias correction of Rational Polynomial Coefficient (RPC) camera models. The images are then... Fully Automated DEM Generation using Satellite Imagery Developing a Geospatially Explicit U.S. Synthetic Population Using Open Source Tools Synthetic populations are a means of representing each individual household and person in an entire country. They are created from census data and several other government sources of information in such a way that a computer representation of every household and person can be created with characteristics such as household size, householder age, householder race, household income, age, gender, and location. RTI used a variety of open source technologies to create it's national synthetic population based on 2010 census and 2007-2011 ACS data. Technlogies include the TranSims population... Developing a Geospatially Explicit U.S. Synthetic Population Using Open Source Tools Balancing operations and open-source innovation in municipal government Description: The City of Raleigh is taking a hybrid approach to implementing geospatial technology to help support existing and future delivery of city services. This session will highlight several specific challenges the city has faced/is facing and corresponding solution sets that have been considered/implemented. Specific attention will be a paid to the influence and role of open source software, open source culture, and open data. Abstract: One of the most fascinating things about municipal government is the number of relevant and meaningful... Balancing operations and open-source innovation in municipal government Cheet'n Death - Tracking Predators in the 'open' Kalahari This session was added at the last minute. Attend to find out more :) Cheet'n Death - Tracking Predators in the 'open' Kalahari Basing LiDAR surveys on (PostgreSQL) geospatial databases: is it possible? LiDAR surveys represent one of the largest datasets involved in GIS, corresponding to "point clouds" containing up to several billions of points including more information than simple geospatial coordinates (flight direction, number of returns, color, etc.). The choice of the technology for the management of these data is therefore crucial. Many tools have been successfully developed to work with LiDAR surveys, based directly on the "LAS files" that collect the point cloud ordered as it is detected: this represent the standard working procedure, even if file readings... Basing LiDAR surveys on (PostgreSQL) geospatial databases: is it possible?
17:40 - 17:55 Pixel Gymnastics Using OpenLayers and Planet Labs Data Planet Labs provides an Open Data sandbox of satellite data from multiple providers, featuring multi-band imagery. OpenLayers 3 introduced the concept of raster sources, which provide a fast way to access and process raster imagery in a browser. In this talk we'll start from the basics of displaying tiled, multi-band satellite data in a web map, and then walk through examples and live coding demos ranging from change detection algorithms to NDVI calculations, image classification, and more! ... Pixel Gymnastics Using OpenLayers and Planet Labs Data Introduction to GTFS: The Standardized Transit Data Feed In 2005, Trimet (Portland, OR Transit System) and Google set off to create a computer readable format of Portland's multimodal transit system. Since then the GTFS documentation has been released to the public and hundreds of agencies all over the world have adopted this open data standard. While the intent of this data feed was originally to just be used in Google Maps other search engines, developers, planners, and GIS professionals have begun to use this data that many host on the open web. This session will be an introduction to how this data feed is laid out as told by a Transit GIS... Introduction to GTFS: The Standardized Transit Data Feed HealthyCity.org - Information + Action for Social Change HealthyCity.org is a community-based web mapping and open data platform that transforms how policy decisions are made by providing community organizations and advocates with innovative tools and methods to expose and resolve structural inequities. Communities throughout California rely on HealthyCity.org to map community conditions, demonstrate community needs, and create strategies and materials for engagement with local representatives and officials. The website democratizes access to data and GIS technology by providing an intuitive interface for constituents to map social indicators and... HealthyCity.org - Information + Action for Social Change Finding Stuff Underwater - Using Open-source Mapping Tools for NASA Underwater Field Science Since 2009, we have been developing and testing Exploration Ground Data Systems (xGDS). xGDS is a software suite, built on open-source web technologies, for supporting NASA terrestrial field science analog missions. We will describe our recent work supporting underwater mapping and dive operations at the Pavilion Lake Research Project (PLRP - www.pavilionlake.com). At PLRP we used open-source mapping technologies to meet an operational need to quickly guide divers and underwater vehicles to locations of interest, and the scientific goal of building a map showing the locations and... Finding Stuff Underwater - Using Open-source Mapping Tools for NASA Underwater Field Science Wrapping up Python into a Cloud-based PostgreSQL Through PostgreSQL’s support for user-defined procedural language functions, the possibilities for data analysis within a database is greatly expanded. Specifically, using PL/Python, one can bring in countless Python libraries to process data close to the database. Here I will talk about my efforts to bring in the functionality of PySAL, a spatial analytics library written in Python and developed largely by Serge Rey, et al. at Arizona State University. PySAL makes available robust exploratory spatial data analysis related to spatial cluster and outlier detection, hotspot detection, spatial... Wrapping up Python into a Cloud-based PostgreSQL
17:55 - 19:00Poster and Map Session
21:00 - 23:00Late Night (Rye Bar at the Marriott)